Big Aftershock Jolts Quake-Hit Province in China A large aftershock hit China's Sichuan province Sunday morning, rattling buildings as far away as Beijing. The tremor comes almost two weeks after the initial earthquake that killed tens of thousands of people.
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Big Aftershock Jolts Quake-Hit Province in China

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Big Aftershock Jolts Quake-Hit Province in China

Big Aftershock Jolts Quake-Hit Province in China

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ARI SHAPIRO, host:

From NPR News, this is WEEKEND EDITION. Liane Hansen is away; I'm Ari Shapiro.

A significant aftershock hit China's Sichuan province this morning. Buildings shook as far away as Beijing. This comes almost two weeks after the initial earthquake that killed tens of thousands of people. NPR's Anthony Kuhn joins us now. And Anthony, describe where you were and what you felt when this hit.

ANTHONY KUHN: Well, Ari, I'm currently in Mianyang City, which is the hardest hit of all the regions of Sichuan in terms of the number of casualties. And what I was doing up here was I was going to a village of a very small ethnic minority called the Chang(ph) to see how they were affected by this earthquake and how they were going to survive and preserve their culture.

And I had just been treated to a wonderful meal of cured pork and noodles by the local folks there when all of a sudden, the mountainside I was on started heaving and shaking very violently. Immediately, everyone came charging out of their houses saying to me, get out, get out. And they huddled in the village square in the center of the village, and they all huddled around me, I think partly to protect me but also out of just sheer terror, which you could see etched on their faces.

Basically the shaking went on for about, I would say, five or six seconds, and everybody looked up the mountainside to see if there were any boulders shaken loose that might come down and crush them. So, it was quite terrifying for the folks there, I must say.

SHAPIRO: Anthony, I know it's still very early, but do you have any sense of the damage that might have been caused by this aftershock?

KUHN: We haven't seen any indication of damage to buildings or houses or any fatalities yet. But I think, really, it's just a reminder here that there are so many people here living on the edge, barely subsisting and still very much at the mercy of nature here.

SHAPIRO: NPR's Anthony Kuhn, thank you very much. And it sounds as though there may still be reports coming in, given that this is very early in the process. So we will keep in touch with you and keep our listeners posted.

KUHN: Thanks, Ari.

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