Joe Prude Remembers His Brother Daniel Following His Death In Police Custody "I didn't call them to come help my brother die," Joe Prude told NPR. "I called them to come help me get my brother some help."
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Joe Prude Remembers His Brother Daniel Following His Death In Police Custody

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Joe Prude Remembers His Brother Daniel Following His Death In Police Custody

Joe Prude Remembers His Brother Daniel Following His Death In Police Custody

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Yesterday, Joe Prude told me about his brother Daniel.

JOE PRUDE: Oh, we had a wonderful relationship as brothers, you know? And you know, like I said before and I keep saying, you know, Daniel was very charismatic. You know, he was a good dude all the way around. He was, you know, down to earth, a good, generous man at heart. He loved the individuals as himself as a human being. And the much overall (ph) and it sums him up man, you know, he was a good Samaritan.

MARTIN: On March 23, Joe Prude got worried. His brother had a history with mental illness, and he just wasn't acting like himself. Earlier in that day, he had sent his brother to a psychiatric hospital. They released him hours later. Joe Prude says Daniel wasn't properly evaluated, and he wasn't given any medication to help. The two brothers were talking together in Joe's house.

PRUDE: We was laughing and reminiscing about old days.

MARTIN: Joe then left the room for a moment. And when he returned, his brother Daniel was gone. Because of Daniel's mental health issues, Joe called 911.

PRUDE: For a person like that that you love so much to just disappear in thin air, it's like wow. How did I lose sight of him that quick when I had my whole eye on him the whole time? And in the process, like, of me trying to figure out which way he went, you know, immediately got on the phone with 911. This is what the outcome I called them for - to lynch my brother? I didn't call them to come help my brother die. I called them to come help me get my brother some help.

MARTIN: What happened when the police showed up?

PRUDE: Well, when the police showed back up to my house for the call after, you know, me placing the call to them once again, you know, officer asked me - is anything wrong with him? I said, no. He said, well, is he a threat to anybody? I said, yeah, to himself. But he ain't no threat to nobody else, and don't y'all kill my brother.

MARTIN: Daniel Prude had left his brother's house in below-freezing temperatures wearing just long underwear and a tank top. When police caught up with him, he was naked. And the newly released bodycam footage shows police putting some kind of hood over his head. Prude gasps for air and vomits.

PRUDE: Everything that they did, they didn't have to do. That excessive force they used on him - the pushup stance on his neck, the knee in his back, holding his legs - that wasn't called for. They didn't have no dignity in what they was doing to my brother. They treated my brother like he was an animal on the street, a stray.

MARTIN: According to police reports, Daniel Prude eventually fell unconscious and stopped breathing. The Prude family believes the police are responsible for his death.

PRUDE: I want to know if them officers going to lose their job and be punished just like any other civilian. And I really do - I really would love to see them stand in front of a judge and have their prosecution just like they prosecuted my brother. They was the judge and the jury and executioner.

MARTIN: Joe Prude talking to us about his brother Daniel Prude. Police took Daniel into custody on March 23, and he died a week later. Joe Prude says it was another two months before his family was informed that Daniel's death was a homicide.

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