Meat Me In St. Louis In this savory word game, Andy Richter (Conan) and Yvette Nicole Brown (Community) work together to change one letter in a movie title, turning one of the words into a non-vegetarian entree.
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Meat Me In St. Louis

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Meat Me In St. Louis

Meat Me In St. Louis

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(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

JONATHAN COULTON, BYLINE: This is ASK ME ANOTHER, NPR's hour of puzzles, word games and inhospitable recording conditions. I'm Jonathan Coulton. Here's your host, Ophira Eisenberg.

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Thanks, Jonathan. We're playing games with "Conan" announcer Andy Richter and "Community's" Yvette Nicole Brown. Now, before we started the taping, our engineer asked Yvette to turn off her fan, so we wouldn't hear it on the recording. But, Yvette, I was just told you can totally turn your fan back on - OK? - if you're uncomfortable.

YVETTE NICOLE BROWN: No, it's totally OK, guys.

ANDY RICHTER: Yvette, I have my air conditioning on.

BROWN: You do? I bet you do, Andy Richter. I care about NPR. Unlike Andy Richter, I care about NPR. And I turned off everything that makes me feel comfortable because I want them to have a good show.

RICHTER: They're printing up some tote bags that say Don't Be Like Andy.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: So you have a new Audible original called Vroom Vroom. It is a comedy that takes place around something I'm very familiar to only recently - a used car sales lot and sales life - upstate New York.

BROWN: How dare you? It's certified preowned.

EISENBERG: Oh, sorry.

(LAUGHTER)

BROWN: I'm done with this interview. Come on, Andy. We're leaving.

EISENBERG: No fan, no fun - I'm out. But I know, you know, you're over in the West Coast, so you have cars. But it's just kind of funny that the subject matter right now resonates with a lot of people over here around New York, who are used to taking public transportation and since have purchased cars.

RICHTER: The LA version of that is rescue dogs.

BROWN: That's true. They're all gone.

EISENBERG: Right.

BROWN: I don't know how I would've survived, though, this pandemic without my dog. I mean, really.

RICHTER: Yeah.

BROWN: It's just - they're the best.

RICHTER: Yeah.

BROWN: They're the best. I didn't get them for the pandemic. I got them a couple years ago. But still...

EISENBERG: You didn't get them for the pandemic.

(LAUGHTER)

BROWN: I mean, I didn't get them as, like, a pandemic accessory. I think I'm going to get a - you know what I need? I need a pandemic dog.

(LAUGHTER)

RICHTER: Get a case of toilet paper and a dog.

BROWN: Some Lysol, some masks. Let me get that dog over there in the corner.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: All right. Are you ready for another game?

RICHTER: Sure.

BROWN: Yes, please.

EISENBERG: This one you're going to work together. This is called Meat Me in St. Louis, but meat is spelled M-E-A-T.

RICHTER: OK.

EISENBERG: So what you're going to do is change one letter in a movie title, and you're going to turn one of the words in to a type of meat, poultry, fish or other nonvegetarian entree.

RICHTER: All right.

BROWN: Let's do it.

EISENBERG: For example, if I said a teen rebel waddles his way into a small town where waterfowl and dancing are outlawed, you would answer Footgoose, changing one letter of "Footloose" to make Footgoose.

RICHTER: OK.

BROWN: I'm going to be horrible at it, but I will enjoy it.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: I like your attitude very much.

RICHTER: Yeah, yeah. I mean are you sure you're going to enjoy it?

(LAUGHTER)

BROWN: I'm pretty sure I'm going to enjoy it.

EISENBERG: All right. So put your heads together.

RICHTER: All right.

EISENBERG: Talk it through. Here we go. Scientists use prehistoric DNA to turn a failed dinosaur theme park into a barbecue island attraction. Everything goes wrong, though, when life finds a way, and the pig roasts the scientists.

BROWN: Jurassic Shark?

RICHTER: No.

BROWN: What?

RICHTER: You just change one vowel in Jurassic...

BROWN: Oh, one...

COULTON: One letter.

BROWN: Jurassic Pork?

EISENBERG: Yeah.

RICHTER: Jurassic Pork.

EISENBERG: Yeah.

BROWN: Oh, I did it.

(LAUGHTER)

BROWN: And I did it. And I was horrible at it.

JONATHAN COULTON AND YVETTE NICOLE BROWN: And I enjoyed it.

RICHTER: You got it.

COULTON: That's right.

EISENBERG: It's good.

RICHTER: I like that for Yvette, shark is a more readily available meat than pork.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: Here's another one. Now that you know how the game is played, Yvette, you're going to kill it.

BROWN: Do I? OK, go.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: Brad Pitt plays a sheep with soft wool who mysteriously ages backwards while yearning for grass to munch on and human connection, until he eventually becomes a tasty curry.

BROWN: Benjamin Mutton.

RICHTER: Right.

COULTON: That is correct.

(LAUGHTER)

BROWN: That was fun. But anything with Brad Pitt is fun. Come on, guys.

COULTON: That's true.

EISENBERG: I know. Brad Pitt and mint sauce? I'm in.

BROWN: Come on. I'm in. I'm in.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: All right. Jonah Hill has 72 hours to deliver the main course for a Christmas dinner to a waiting audience in LA. The spiral cut, pink meat is obviously voiced by a wisecracking Russell Brand.

BROWN: I don't know this one.

RICHTER: That's Get Ham to the Greek.

EISENBERG: That's right.

BROWN: That's dope. Love it, love it.

EISENBERG: Yes.

COULTON: All right. This is the last one. Elijah Wood embarks on an epic bar crawl through Middle Earth in order to destroy the one drumette in the fiery Buffalo source of Mount Blue Cheese, where it was forged.

ANDY RICHTER AND YVETTE NICOLE BROWN: Lord of the Wings.

COULTON: Lord of the Wings.

EISENBERG: Yeah.

COULTON: You got it.

BROWN: I got to say, guys, I feel good about myself.

RICHTER: Yeah.

BROWN: I feel like I applied myself.

COULTON: I think you should feel good about yourself. You did a great job.

EISENBERG: Yeah. I feel like there's something in all of this that was our personal best.

BROWN: I agree.

(LAUGHTER)

BROWN: Though fleeting, I agree.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Andy Richter, Yvette Nicole Brown, thank you so much. What a pleasure.

BROWN: Thank you.

RICHTER: Thanks, Ophira. Thank you for having us.

BROWN: It was wonderful.

RICHTER: And thank you, Jonathan.

COULTON: Thank you, guys.

BROWN: Thanks, guys.

EISENBERG: Andy Richter and Yvette Nicole Brown star in the Audible original series "Vroom Vroom."

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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