Top of the News The latest headlines.
NPR logo

Top of the News

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/91233110/91232147" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Top of the News

Top of the News

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/91233110/91232147" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

MIKE PESCA, host:

Welcome back to the Bryant Park Project from NPR News. We are on digital FM Sirius Satellite Radio, online at npr.org/bryantpark, and we're in the background of certain Herbie Hancock videos. I'm Mike Pesca. Coming up, let them eat bacon salt! But first, let's get the latest news headlines from the BPP's Mark Garrison.

BILL WOLFF: This is NPR.

MARK GARRISON: Thank you, Mike. Police detains Zimbabwe's opposition presidential candidate again today. Morgan Tsvangirai was on the way to a political rally. This is the second time in as many days he's been inside a police station. His runoff election against long-time president Robert Mugabe is set for June 27th.

Five men accused of planning the 9/11 attacks were arraigned in a Guantanamo Bay courtroom yesterday. NPR's Jackie Northam was there.

JACKIE NORTHAM: Military officials say it's the first time all five men have been together since their individual arrest at least five years ago. Before court began, the men were laughing and gesticulating, and continued to talk to each other while the arraignment was going on. At times, offering advice to each other, particularly when it came to the use of self-representation. Each of the five prisoners wants to represent themselves, but some agreed to keep military or civilian lawyers on as advisors. The judge deferred making a decision in other cases, over concerns of whether the prisoner is competent.

GARRISON: NPR's Jackie Northam reporting from Guantanamo Bay.

After a long legal fight, Blackwater's California training grounds are now open. The military contractor had to sue local officials to open it. The first day of training was yesterday. The company has drawn a lot of criticism for its work in Iraq. It says lawmakers who tried to stop the training facility were playing politics.

The Air Force Secretary and its top general are out. Defense Secretary Robert Gates is angry at problems with nuclear weapons security. NPR's Tom Bowman has more.

TOM BOWMAN: Gates says the Air Force has declining standards when it comes to its nuclear weapons. That assessment comes from a classified report by a Navy admiral criticizing how the Air Force maintains its nuclear weapons. One source called it - pretty damning. Sources say the report chided the Air Force for not having a senior person overseeing its nuclear weapons, and for losing focus on maintaining the arsenal. Several other generals are said to be criticized in the report.

Gates asked for the report after an Air Force mishap, fuses used to trigger a nuclear ballistic missiles were mistakenly sent to Taiwan in 2006, and discovered only in March. Last year, another incident, B-52 pilots accidentally ferried six nuclear warheads across the United States.

GARRISON: NPR's Tom Bowman reporting from the Pentagon.

And high-schoolers in Pennsylvania had an actual senior at their senior prom last night. Eighty-three year old World War II veteran Kenneth Smith never got to go to his prom - he was drafted in 1943 - so last night he put on the tux and took a limo to the dance. He said it's not just for him, but for other GI's who never got to go their prom.

That is your news. It's always online at npr.org.

BILL WOLFF: This is NPR.

Copyright © 2008 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.