U.S. Consulate's Manhole Comment Riles Mumbai India's largest city complains that advice from the U.S. consulate makes Mumbai look bad. After monsoon rains began, the U.S. consulate warned people not to fall into manholes. City workers open manhole covers during floods and leave them unattended. One official says the open manholes have killed, at most, 10 people.
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U.S. Consulate's Manhole Comment Riles Mumbai

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U.S. Consulate's Manhole Comment Riles Mumbai

U.S. Consulate's Manhole Comment Riles Mumbai

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. India's largest city is defending itself against an outrageous American slur. It came from the U.S. consulate in Mumbai. After monsoon rains started, the U.S. consulate warned people not to fall into manholes. Workers open manhole covers during floods and leave them unattended. The city once known as Bombay complains that this advice makes the city look bad. One official says the open manholes have only killed, at most, about 10 people. It's MORNING EDITION.

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