NBA Ads Inspire Spoofs An NBA commercial running on TV right now features the faces of two rival players delivering the same earnest monologue in split-screen. It's quickly become fodder for parodies. NPR features some of the best from this budding genre.
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NBA Ads Inspire Spoofs

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NBA Ads Inspire Spoofs

NBA Ads Inspire Spoofs

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ALEX COHEN, host:

And finally, tonight it's game six of the NBA Finals which means we might be saying goodbye to an ad campaign. Madeleine, there can be only one.

(Soundbite of commercial)

Mr. KOBE BRYANT and Mr. KEVIN GARNETT (NBA Basketball Players): There's so many emotions at the end of the season, and nobody likes to talk about it, but one of them is fear. Fear that you come this far, and it can all end. The dream could die.

MADELEINE BRAND, host:

That's LA Laker Kobe Bryant, and Boston Celtic Kevin Garnett in one of a series of NBA Playoff commercials. If you haven't been watching, they feature two players reading the same monologue in split screen. They're mostly today's stars like Tim Duncan and Chris Paul.

(Soundbite of commercial)

Mr. TIM DUNCAN and Mr. CHRIS PAUL (NBA Basketball Players): For me, I like the fear. It means I'm close. It means I'm ready.

COHEN: There's also one with players from the past, Magic Johnson and Larry Bird.

(Soundbite of commercial)

Mr. MAGIC JOHNSON and Mr. LARRY BIRD (Former NBA Basketball Players): Rivalries are born, but they never die. Rivalries live on.

BRAND: Tonight may be the last time you're able to see these ads, that is if the Celtics win in game six. But what would any successful ad campaign be without parodies. You'll probably be seeing them for some time.

COHEN: There was the "Saturday Night Live," Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton version where both candidates go a little off script.

(Soundbite of TV show "Saturday Night Live')

Unidentified Man and Unidentified Women: Now, two candidates remain, only one mathematically viable. Both have their assets, charisma, ambition, and their liabilities.

Unidentified Woman: Reverend Jeremiah Wright.

Unidentified Man: Bill Clinton.

Unidentified Man and Unidentified Woman: And they both have their eyes on one prize, the Democratic nomination in 2012. It's not over until all the votes are counted.

Unidentified Woman: Including Michigan and Florida.

BRAND: Adam Sandler and NBA star Baron Davis did one to promote Sandler's new movie "You Don't Mess With the Zohan."

(Soundbite of commercial)

Mr. ADAM SANDLER and Mr. BARON DAVIS: All your life, you have a dream.

Mr. DAVIS: No, no, no, my friend. It's pronounced a dream.

Mr. SANDLER: A dream?

Mr. DAVIS: No, no, no, no, no.

Mr. SANDLER: You have a dream?

Mr. DAVIS: No. You chave a dream. No, no, you want to make the playoffs, I say you change your hair.

COHEN: Little surprise, YouTube has a few versions, too. Here's a fake one with Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds.

(Soundbite of YouTube commercial)

Unidentified Man #2 and Unidentified Man #3: (As Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds) There's so many tools players use in the off season and nobody likes to talk about it, but one of them is needles. Needles that get put in your butt to make you grow harder.

BRAND: OK, Alex, and here's the one you and I did.

BRAND and COHEN: There are so many emotions at the end of the show, and one of them is fear. Fear that you've come a whole hour and the show will end, but I like the fear. It means I'm close. It means I can go home.

COHEN: Day to Day is a production of NPR News with contributions from slate.com. I'm Alex Cohen.

BRAND: And I'm Madeleine Brand.

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