Mr. Phelps' Mission: Saving U.S. At The Olympics The United States faces tough competition in individual sports, and athletes from other countries now dominate contests in which Americans once excelled. But then there's swimming champion Michael Phelps, the great U.S. hope in this summer's Olympic Games.
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Mr. Phelps' Mission: Saving U.S. At The Olympics

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Mr. Phelps' Mission: Saving U.S. At The Olympics

Mr. Phelps' Mission: Saving U.S. At The Olympics

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ARI SHAPIRO, Host:

Serena Williams and her sister, Venus, are the only Americans still vying for a Wimbledon singles title. Commentator Frank Deford says they are two exceptions to a general trend.

FRANK DEFORD: So much is NBC counting on Phelps to supply both live drama and real glory in August that it is hyping him now by showing four nights of the swimming trials in prime time. Bob Costas has already advised Phelps on the air that he bids fair to join Michael Jordan and Tiger Woods as a consecrated American demigod.

B: Everybody, out of the pool!

SHAPIRO: The comments of Frank Deford, who jumps in each Wednesday from member station WFHU in Fairfield, Connecticut.

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