Letters: King Kong, Sunday Puzzle Listeners have written in about last week's "In Character" story about the legend of King Kong. And one shares a moving story about her late husband's love for Weekend Edition Sunday and the Sunday Puzzle segment.
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Letters: King Kong, Sunday Puzzle

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Letters: King Kong, Sunday Puzzle

Letters: King Kong, Sunday Puzzle

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LIANE HANSEN, host:

You're listening to Weekend Edition from NPR News. Time now for your letters. Several of you wrote in about Robert Malesky's In Character series story last week about the legend of "King Kong." John Freitero(ph) of New York City recalls that he saw the film during its first run. "It was wildly and luridly advertised at the same time that the Ringling Brothers Circus in New York was advertising its feature attraction, "Gargantua: the great gorilla". Too large for its cage and with the scar that gave his mouth the permanent snarl. Even now I suspect that the fact and fiction were deliberately confused in both narratives."

John Cooper Baker(ph) of Princeton, New Jersey, shared a personal story about the film's creator and director, his great uncle, Merian Cooper. "The ideas and concepts of the themes in the movie have been and will be the subject of debate forever," he writes. "I can only relate that while my great uncle Merian may have been a southern gentleman, he was also ahead of his time in thinking out of the box. His tales of the filming even two plus decades afterwards, as related across the dinner table here in Princeton at his brother's house, were always enlightening, some of which will remain forever in the family." And finally, Shoshana Caruvulla(ph) of Aurora, Colorado, wrote to us about her husband Chaco's(ph) love for our show. He passed away four years ago.

Ms. SHOSHANA CARUVULLA (Caller): Chaco delighted in Liane's chuckles and love of music, the incisive yet (unintelligible) nature of her interviewing, her insatiable curiosity about all things around us, and her handling of the program. During the course of years, he became an avid puzzle player under Will Shortz. He so appreciated his easygoing on air manner and brilliance. The last five years of his life he would arrange all his chemo and radiation around the program so that he won't miss it. Every Sunday evening, faithfully, he would send out the answer to the program, knowing, knowing that you would be calling in a couple of days to ask him to play the puzzle on air the following Sunday.

When the call did not come that week, he would say, oh well, next week for sure. My niece Ivy(ph) has this cute story which she tells everybody. The day after his cremation, she is sitting on the patio weeping silent tears and missing him. Then she swears she sees her uncle, who was always known for his humor, up there right in front of her. He tells her, you know, Ivy, I'm so happy here now because now I know all the answers to the Sunday puzzle. All of us in Chaco's family, we're all so comforted to know that he has now gone on to puzzle heaven. Thank you, Liane. Thank you, Will, for making his life so joyous for so many years.

HANSEN: No. Thank you, Shoshana. We appreciate what you have to say. Visit our Web page npr.org and click on the link that says "Contact Us." This is NPR News.

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