'The Witches' Review: Unimaginative Retread Lacks The Magic Of Dahl's Classic Though Anne Hathaway throws herself into the role of the Grand High Witch with obvious relish, she often seems to be straining for effect — which leaves The Witches feeling flat.
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Unimaginative 'Witches' Retread Lacks The Magic Of Roald Dahl's Classic

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Unimaginative 'Witches' Retread Lacks The Magic Of Roald Dahl's Classic

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Movie Reviews

Unimaginative 'Witches' Retread Lacks The Magic Of Roald Dahl's Classic

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TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. Our film critic Justin Chang has always been a big fan of Roald Dahl's fantasy novel "The Witches." It's about a boy and his grandmother who find themselves battling the forces of evil during a seaside holiday. Now there's a new film adaptation directed by Robert Zemeckis. It features an ensemble cast led by Anne Hathaway and Octavia Spencer. Here's Justin's review.

JUSTIN CHANG, BYLINE: Roald Dahl's 1983 novel "The Witches" takes place in a world where witches really exist, though they don't wear pointy hats or fly around on broomsticks. Instead, they walk among us disguised as ordinary women but wielding extraordinary magical powers, which they use to wipe out young children, their greatest enemies. It's been my favorite Dahl story since I read it as a kid. And the 1990 movie adaptation directed by the great Nicholas Roeg is about as creepy and captivating a film as it could have inspired. It starred Anjelica Huston in one of her most delicious performances. As the all-powerful Grand High Witch, she was vampy, imperious and diabolically unhinged.

And so with their new adaptation of "The Witches," the director, Robert Zemeckis, and his star Anne Hathaway clearly have big shoes to fill. But even with a few intriguing narrative liberties, the movie is ultimately a flat, unimaginative retread of Dahl's story, with moments of arch comedy that proved distancing rather than enveloping. And while Hathaway throws herself into the role of the Grand High Witch with obvious relish, she often seems to be straining for effect, even adopting a pan-European accent that sounds like a cross between Greta Garbo and the villainous Natasha from "Rocky And Bullwinkle." Something seems off even in this early scene in which she and her coven of witches arrive at a seaside hotel for their annual convention. They're pretending to be a children's charity. And the Grand High Witch, petting her black cat, has a question for the manager, played by Stanley Tucci.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "THE WITCHES")

ANNE HATHAWAY: (As Grand High Witch) I know you love kitties.

STANLEY TUCCI: (As Mr. Stringer, laughter) They're cute.

HATHAWAY: (As Grand High Witch) But what do you think of mice?

TUCCI: (As Mr. Stringer) There would never be any mice...

HATHAWAY: (As Grand High Witch) But if there were...

TUCCI: (As Mr. Stringer) I would call the exterminator.

HATHAWAY: (As Grand High Witch) Exactly. You see, girls, he would call the exterminator just like any normal human with his head screwed on right. He would exterminate those brats.

TUCCI: (As Mr. Stringer) Rats - we would exterminate the rats.

CHANG: There's a reason the Grand High Witch is so interested in rodents. She's devised a scheme to transform all the children of the world into mice. The grizzly details come out at their top-secret meeting in the hotel ballroom where the witches remove their disguises, the wigs that cover their bald heads and the shoes that hide their toeless feet. What they don't realize is that they're being secretly spied on by a nameless young boy. That's the hero of the story played by Jahzir Bruno. When he's discovered, they turn him into a mouse - a setback, to be sure, but hardly a fatal one. After escaping the witches' clutches, the boy soon learns that being a nimble, four-legged animal has its advantages. He's been staying at the hotel with his grandmother, played with her usual sturdiness by Octavia Spencer, who has deep knowledge of the supernatural.

The rest of the story, which follows their plans to turn the tables on the witches, plays out more or less as it did in Dahl's novel. The most significant change here is the setting. The book and the earlier film were both set in Norway and the U.K. Zemeckis, who wrote the script with Guillermo del Toro and Kenya Barris, creator of the TV show "Black-ish," has relocated the story to 1967 Alabama. That backdrop, along with the casting of two Black actors in lead roles, introduces an intriguing racial subtext that isn't sufficiently developed. The movie sometimes directs our attention to the contrast between the hotel's mostly Black staff and its wealthy white clientele. At one point, Grandma flashes back to her childhood in the segregated South, where she once had a close run-in with a witch herself. Later, Grandma notes that witches only prey on the poor and the overlooked, an intriguing idea that the movie doesn't follow through on. These witches - themselves a reasonably diverse bunch - don't seem to discriminate when it comes to stalking children.

"The Witches" has been in the works for several years and was originally intended to be a stop-motion animated film directed by Guillermo del Toro. But in the end, the assignment fell to Zemeckis, who has a decent, if erratic, track record with family-friendly fantasy movies, ranging from a classic like "Who Framed Roger Rabbit" to misfires like "The Polar Express." At times, I found myself wishing that he would tap into the magic of his 1992 dark comedy "Death Becomes Her," still one of his most audacious movies and certainly his witchiest story before this one. Apart from the cute, if overly cartoonish-looking mice, most of the visual effects budget seems to have gone toward making Hathaway look as grotesque as possible. Beyond her ability to fly and shoot death rays out of her eyeballs, this grand high witch has three fingers on each hand, a single toe on each foot, which is more than the other witches have, and most disturbingly, a sharp-toothed grin that stretches from ear to ear. Whether she's ranting at her subordinates for their incompetence or sniffing out a child right under her nose, Hathaway is clearly giving it her all. And I have to admit, I couldn't look away from her. She may be no match for Anjelica Huston, but she's still the closest this movie gets to casting a spell.

GROSS: Justin Chang is film critic for the LA Times. He reviewed "The Witches," which is now streaming on HBO Max. Tomorrow on FRESH AIR, we'll examine Joe Biden's life and political career with Evan Osnos, a staff writer for The New Yorker and author of the new book "Joe Biden: The Life, The Run, And What Matters Now." It's based on extensive interviews with Biden, as well as interviews with Obama and about 100 other people who have worked with Biden. I hope you'll join us.

(SOUNDBITE OF AKUA DIXON'S "A GOZAR CON MI COMBO")

GROSS: FRESH AIR's executive producer is Danny Miller. Our technical director and engineer is Audrey Bentham. Our interviews and reviews are produced and edited by Amy Salit, Phyllis Myers, Sam Briger, Lauren Krenzel, Heidi Saman, Therese Madden, Ann Marie Baldonado, Thea Chaloner, Seth Kelley and Kayla Lattimore. Our associate producer of digital media is Molly Seavy-Nesper. Roberta Shorrock directs the show. I'm Terry Gross.

(SOUNDBITE OF AKUA DIXON'S "A GOZAR CON MI COMBO")

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