With Sequel Out, Kazakhstan Uses 'Borat' To Its Advantage In his 2006 movie Borat, Sacha Baron Cohen humiliates Kazakhstan. The country's new ad campaign shows tourists surprised by all it has to offer. Each spot ends with Borat's catchphrase: Very Nice!
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With Sequel Out, Kazakhstan Uses 'Borat' To Its Advantage

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With Sequel Out, Kazakhstan Uses 'Borat' To Its Advantage

With Sequel Out, Kazakhstan Uses 'Borat' To Its Advantage

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. In his 2006 movie "Borat," Sacha Baron Cohen ritually humiliates Kazakhstan. The country responded as you would have expected it to by banning him. The new "Borat" sequel is perhaps even less kind to the country, but Kazakhstan has decided to try to use "Borat" to its advantage this time. A new ad campaign shows tourists surprised by all the country has to offer. Each spot ends with Borat's catchphrase - (imitating Borat) very nice. It's MORNING EDITION.

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