Lenape Indians, The Original Philadelphians The Lenape Indians were the first inhabitants of what is now Philadelphia. Tribe member Chet Brooks tells NPR's Robert Smith about the tribe and how the community maintains its traditions today.
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Lenape Indians, The Original Philadelphians

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Lenape Indians, The Original Philadelphians

Lenape Indians, The Original Philadelphians

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ROBERT SMITH, host:

You're listening to Weekend Edition from NPR News. Time now for your letters. From Rochester, New York, Rick de Jesus Roof(ph) writes that our series, "Who Is An American?", brought back some of his own memories. "I spent my adolescence in Philly and returned for a 14-year stint as an adult," he wrote. "The neighborhood of my youth was segregated. However, in West Mount Airy, where I lived as an adult, we did have everyone, including blacks and Puerto Ricans, gay and straight, Jewish and Christian, immigrant and native born." "My wish," he writes, "is that more of Philadelphia and more of the United States would be like West Mount Airy. That is America to me."

Jennifer Ludden's report on DNA testing of refugees prompted this response from Arisha Rouse(ph) of Acton, Massachusetts.

Ms. ARISHA ROUSE (Caller): I was somewhat uncomfortable listening to the story about DNA testing of refugees to verify family connections. I could not figure out why until I realized that my survival hinged on the fact that there was no DNA technology in wartime Poland during World War II. My mother, grandmother, and I survived on false papers denying our being Jewish while my father perished in a concentration camp. This technology in the Nazi hands would have been used to create yet another database to facilitate killing. Somehow this invasion into the actual body of a person seems to cross a boundary.

SMITH: And Ronda Fisson(ph) of Richmond, Virginia, wrote that she got a kick out of our interview with NPR's Jonathan Kern. He wrote a book about how driveway moments are created. That's when a story is so compelling that it keeps you in your car listening to the radio. Here's the letter. "As a relatively new listener of NPR, I found this interview so interesting that I literally sat in my car in the driveway finishing up both the interview and my morning latte. During the interview, Mr. Kern wondered if radio news is a dying concern. From my perspective, I say no."

"When I was younger," she writes, "I rarely listened to talk radio and generally only tuned into NPR for news. But as I've gotten older, I find I'd much rather learn something about the world than spend precious minutes of life on annoying radio commercials and even more annoying radio DJs. Thanks to all of you at NPR for what you do." Well, on behalf of NPR, you are welcome. And you can tell us about your own driveway moments. Go to npr.org and click on the "Contact Us" link. And don't forget to visit our blog. It's at npr.org/soapbox.

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