Chef Apologizes After Recommending Toxic Greens Celebrity chef Anthony Worrall Thompson says he's sorry he recommended a salad ingredient that could kill someone. He told a magazine that tasty salads can include a plant called "henbane." But "henbane" means "killer of hens," and it's deadly in large doses. Small amounts cause hallucinations. The chef says he meant to name a different, harmless weed called "fat hen."
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Chef Apologizes After Recommending Toxic Greens

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Chef Apologizes After Recommending Toxic Greens

Chef Apologizes After Recommending Toxic Greens

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

A celebrity chef says he's sorry he recommended a salad ingredient that could kill you. Anthony Worrall Thompson told a magazine that tasty salads can include a plant called henbane, which would make for an interesting meal. The word henbane means killer of hens. It is deadly in large doses. Small amounts cause hallucinations. Before you ask what the chef was smoking, he explains he meant to name a different, harmless weed called fat hen. It's MORNING EDITION.

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