Scientist Finds New Way To Get Prints Off Bullet He may not handle a gun as artfully as that other Bond, but University of Leicester scientist John Bond has made a real contribution to crime fighting. He has figured out a way for forensics experts to take a fingerprint off a bullet, even if the shooter has wiped the casing clean. The technique has already helped reopen three cold cases.
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Scientist Finds New Way To Get Prints Off Bullet

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Scientist Finds New Way To Get Prints Off Bullet

Scientist Finds New Way To Get Prints Off Bullet

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JACKI LYDEN, host:

And whose name gets 6.1 million hits on Google?

(Soundbite of song)

Bond. John Bond, that is. This guy may not handle a gun so artfully and we're guessing he's not so debonair. He's a physicist after all, but John Bond has made a real contribution to crime fighting. He's figured out a way for forensic experts to take a fingerprint off a bullet even if a shooter has wiped the casing clean. You've seen this movie.

An advance that even Q might not believe. But it's been reported in the Journal of Forensic Sciences and the Journal of Applied Physics. The old way of fingerprinting developed 100 years ago relies on a chemical that reacts to the presence of sweat. When that sweat is wiped clean, too bad. It turns out that a sweaty finger corrodes certain metals ever so slightly.

And John Bond and his team at the University of Lester in England came up with a technique for working fine powder into those corroded microscopic grooves with the help of an electrical charge. The technique has already helped reopen three cold cases. John Bond, you've earned that martini any way you like it.

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