Australian Town Forced To Clean Up After 'Hairy Panic' Winds brought so many tumbleweeds to a Melbourne suburb that people reported being trapped in their homes. The influx of tumbleweeds, known as a hairy panic in Australia, were 14 feet high in spots.
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Australian Town Forced To Clean Up After 'Hairy Panic'

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Australian Town Forced To Clean Up After 'Hairy Panic'

Australian Town Forced To Clean Up After 'Hairy Panic'

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NOEL KING, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Noel King. Hairy panic descended on an Australian suburb over the weekend. That doesn't mean Aussies were freaking out about their hair. It means huge piles of tumbleweed. High winds and native grass created stacks of tumbleweed in a northwest suburb of Melbourne, some as high as 14 feet. Residents had to clear paths to get out of their homes, only to have it all come tumbling back the next day. It's MORNING EDITION.

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