Meet Beave, The Most Famous Beaver On TikTok Nancy Coyne is a wildlife rehabilitator who has been documenting the experience of raising a lone beaver. His name is Beave.

Meet Beave, The Internet's Most Famous Beaver

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LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

His name is Beave. And he does what beavers do - builds dams.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

NANCY COYNE: Beave, those are Christmas presents.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Except Beave does it with the contents of Nancy Coyne's house - with Christmas presents...

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

COYNE: He's got the chews. Beave, you got the chews.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: ...Or shoes. Beave is not a pet. The baby beaver was rescued and is being rehabbed at Coyne's home in New York's Hudson Valley. And as she shows on her TikTok account @beaverbabyfurrylove, it has required a lot of patience. Beave is one of a number of animals being helped by Raising The Wild New York. Nancy Coyne and Beave join us now.

Welcome to WEEKEND EDITION.

COYNE: Thank you, Lulu.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: I am obsessed with this account. You have millions of likes on your video, so I'm not alone. Tell me, how did you come across Beave?

COYNE: Well, I received a call, as I normally do for a lot of rehabs. And the woman said that she had found a baby beaver on the side of the road. So I said, of course you can bring it to me. I would accept it. And when she pulled up, I went outside, and she was carrying this little box. So I opened up the box. And sure enough, there was a little baby beaver...

GARCIA-NAVARRO: (Laughter).

COYNE: ...No bigger than the size of a russet potato.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Wow. Why is he staying in your home?

COYNE: Well, beavers, because they are so highly social, cannot be left alone like our other rehabs do. So with a beaver, they seek out the nurturing, the close contact that they need to thrive. Without that, they can die from something called isolation stress. What will happen is they will shut down. They will stop eating. And then they will slowly die.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So isolation stress - I think that's something we can all understand at this...

COYNE: Yes. Absolutely.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: ...Particular point.

COYNE: Yes.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: As we've noted, Beave likes to be a beaver. Tell us a little bit about his habit of dam building with the contents of your house.

COYNE: So he started doing this - and I did expect this. I knew that this would happen. And Beave started just kind of collecting anything that he could get his little paws on. So anything that was at his height, you know...

GARCIA-NAVARRO: (Laughter).

COYNE: ...Around the house, he would grab. He does seem to like doorways. He dams a lot in front of my front door. But honestly...

GARCIA-NAVARRO: (Laughter).

COYNE: ...I don't know why he chooses those locations. But what we did just to make life easier for myself and him is I started, like, a little dam pile. So he doesn't have to go around the house and collect everything, and I don't have to put it back.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Yeah, except that he did take your shoes.

COYNE: And he frequently...

(LAUGHTER)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: I just want to play a little clip of him chewing a stick. It is adorable.

COYNE: (Laughter).

(SOUNDBITE OF BEAVER CHEWING)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: But he also makes these weird noises when he eats. This is him eating some kale.

(SOUNDBITE OF BEAVER CHEWING AND VOCALIZING)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: What is that noise? What is happening there?

COYNE: Beavers live in large colonies, which are their families. So it's kind of like what those little baby beaver kits do - is they'd whine. And that whine will encourage their parents and their older siblings to give up their food.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: OK. That makes sense. So when will beaver be released back into the wild?

COYNE: So beaver kits typically will leave their colonies at the age of between 2 and 3 years old. But around the age of 2, his hormones should start to kick in like they would in the wild, and he's going to want to set out to find a mate. So around 2 years old, I expect that we'll start a very slow soft-release process.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That's Nancy Coyne, also known as @beaverbabyfurrylove on TikTok.

Thank you very much.

COYNE: Thank you, Lulu.

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