Panel Question The most maskical place on Earth.
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Panel Question

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Panel Question

Panel Question

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BILL KURTIS: Here's a moment we loved with our own pod of panelists.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED NPR BROADCAST)

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Tom, this week, Disney World announced that they had hired additional staff to help their maskless guests by doing what?

TOM BODETT: Throw them out?

SAGAL: No, I'll give you a hint. You know, it's just using a little Disney magic and a little Photoshop.

BODETT: Oh, my God. They're going to Photoshop masks on the maskless people?

SAGAL: That's exactly right.

BODETT: So people think everybody at Disney World has masks on?

SAGAL: Precisely right. And people don't have to be embarrassed about showing their ride photos during the pandemic because they had masks digitally added to their faces in those ride photos you buy at the end of roller coasters.

HELEN HONG: What?

SAGAL: No, I mean, this is great. So if you didn't wear a mask on your Disney visit, don't worry, Disney is now Photoshopping masks onto your picture so you can have it displayed at your funeral and convince people it wasn't your fault.

BODETT: Wouldn't it just be easier to wear the mask? You know, it's just like - it's just not that hard.

SAGAL: Now, I should say, once this story got around, Disney announced they will no longer be digitally adding masks to photographs of their guests. They say if you get sick at the park, they'll just cryogenically freeze you until there's enough vaccine to go around.

(LAUGHTER)

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