Recipe for a Rite of Passage Russell Parsons, a retired pipe-fitter in the town of Hurricane, W. Va., has tattooed some specific directions on his right arm. The instructions are for when he dies: Cremate him at 1,800 degrees for two to three hours. To reinforce the message, the tattoo features orange and yellow flames.
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Recipe for a Rite of Passage

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Recipe for a Rite of Passage

Recipe for a Rite of Passage

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

If you're a person who writes notes on your palm, you have nothing on Russell Parsons. He's a retired pipe fitter in the town of Hurricane, West Virginia, and he took some notes with a tattoo. The tattoo is on his right arm and it provides a recipe for how to cremate him when he dies. It says to cook him at 1,800 degrees for two to three hours. For anybody who doesn't get the message, the tattoo also includes orange and yellow flames.

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