Instead Of Throwing Out Your Christmas Tree, Why Not Eat It? In what sounds like a terrifying cookbook, How to Eat Your Christmas Tree, artisan baker Julia Georgallis offers recipes such as Christmas Tree pickles, Christmas-cured fish and Blue Spruce ice cream.
NPR logo

Instead Of Throwing Out Your Christmas Tree, Why Not Eat It?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/954788678/954788679" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Instead Of Throwing Out Your Christmas Tree, Why Not Eat It?

Instead Of Throwing Out Your Christmas Tree, Why Not Eat It?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/954788678/954788679" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

NOEL KING, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Noel King. It's the first weekend after the new year, which means we're about to see a lot of Christmas trees out on the curb. Instead of tossing the tree, why not eat it? In what sounds like a terrifying new cookbook, "How To Eat Your Christmas Tree," the artisan baker Julia Georgallis offers recipes like Christmas tree pickles, Christmas cured fish and blue spruce ice cream. Not all trees are edible, though. Stay away from the fake ones. It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2021 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.