Companies Check Out Applicants On Facebook A recent survey found that one in five company managers checked out job applicants on Facebook or other social networking sites. And one-third of them found content that led them to reject a candidate. The survey by CareerBuilder.com found that one turnoff for potential employers is pictures of the applicants drinking or using drugs.
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Companies Check Out Applicants On Facebook

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Companies Check Out Applicants On Facebook

Companies Check Out Applicants On Facebook

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RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

And today's Last Word in Business is too much information. We've heard a lot lately about the perils of baring your soul or even your wild ways on Facebook. A recent survey has found that one in five company managers checks out job applicants on Facebook or other social networking sites, and a third of them found content that led them to reject a candidate. Tanya Flynn is with CareerBuilder.com, which did the study. She mentions a few turn offs.

TANYA FLYNN: There's obviously inappropriate content. You know, people who are posting pictures of themselves drinking or using drugs.

MONTAGNE: Flynn says managers also check to see if candidates will fit in to the company.

FLYNN: If you're on your social networking site bad-mouthing a former employer or co-workers, you're probably likely to do that when you start working for another company.

MONTAGNE: The survey also shows that of employers who did not check applicants pages, nearly 10 percent said they'll start. And that's the Business News on Morning Edition from NPR News.

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