Florida, Ohio Accommodate Voters Florida Gov. Charlie Crist has declared a voting emergency in the state. To combat long lines, he ordered early-voting polls to remain open for 12 hours on weekdays and for 12 hours total over the weekend. In Ohio, a federal judge ruled that homeless people who want to vote may legally use the address of any place they've spent the night.
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Florida, Ohio Accommodate Voters

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Florida, Ohio Accommodate Voters

Florida, Ohio Accommodate Voters

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And early voting in Florida has so overwhelmed polls there that the governor called a state of emergency. Early voting in the state began October 20, and more than 10 percent of Florida's registered voters have already cast ballots. Turnout was so strong that voters in many places waited hours in line. By calling an emergency, Governor Charlie Crist was able to keep polls open for 12 hours on weekdays and for a total of 12 hours over the weekend.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Here's some other election news. In Ohio yesterday, a federal judge ruled that homeless people who want to vote can legally use any place they've spent the night as their official address. It can be a shelter or a relative's house or even a park bench. The Ohio secretary of state says polls will accept these non-traditional addresses. And if the voter doesn't have sufficient identification, a provisional ballot will be issued so they can vote provisionally and check on the details later.

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