Ahmed Zaki Yamani, Key To Making Saudi Arabia A World Oil Power, Dies At 90 He was Saudi Arabia's oil minister for nearly 25 years, rising to fame for engineering the 1973 oil embargo and negotiating Saudi control of Aramco from U.S. fuel giants.
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Ahmed Zaki Yamani, Key To Making Saudi Arabia A World Oil Power, Dies At 90

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Ahmed Zaki Yamani, Key To Making Saudi Arabia A World Oil Power, Dies At 90

Ahmed Zaki Yamani, Key To Making Saudi Arabia A World Oil Power, Dies At 90

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

A legendary figure in the oil world died yesterday. Sheikh Ahmed Zaki Yamani was the Saudi Arabian oil minister who led the 1973 oil embargo. NPR's Jackie Northam reports on how he helped the kingdom become an energy powerhouse.

JACKIE NORTHAM, BYLINE: Sheikh Ahmed Zaki Yamani was born a commoner, the son of an Islamic judge who taught him to debate and think logically. Yamani studied at New York University and Harvard before heading back to Saudi Arabia, where he gained a reputation as a brilliant lawyer and newspaper columnist. That's how he caught the eye of King Faisal, who named Yamani as oil minister in 1962. Ellen Wald, author of the book "Saudi, Inc.," a history of the kingdom's oil industry, says it was a surprising decision.

ELLEN WALD: Yamani was not an oil market specialist. He was a lawyer, and he was a negotiator above all else. And he was a very shrewd negotiator. That was really where his skill set lay. And in the late '60s and the 1970s, that's what Saudi Arabia needed.

NORTHAM: As oil minister, Yamani quickly consolidated Saudi Arabia's reputation as head of OPEC. After the 1973 war with Israel, Arab states called for an oil embargo to protest Washington's backing of Israel. Prices for crude oil skyrocketed, and there were long queues at gas stations across the U.S. And Yamani became the public face of the oil embargo, says Daniel Yergin, author of "The New Map" about energy and climate change.

DANIEL YERGIN: Saudi Arabia became a very rich country, a very important part of the world economy, courted by Western banks, and it had the revenues to really start to develop. And Yamani was really the man at the spigot.

NORTHAM: Around the same time, Yamani began negotiating for Saudi control of Aramco, the oil company, which at that time was controlled by four U.S. companies. Yergin says Yamani played his cards very carefully, negotiating a deal that allowed the kingdom to control Aramco.

YERGIN: Saudi Arabia did not just grab Aramco from the Western companies. It negotiated this participation so by the early 1980s, it had full control. But it also ended up maintaining very good relations with those companies and looked to them for technology and even for personnel.

NORTHAM: Today, Aramco is one of the world's most profitable companies. But there were traumatic moments during Yamani's career as oil minister. In 1975, he was present when King Faisal was gunned down by a nephew. Ellen Wald says a couple of months later, Yamani's life was in danger again.

WALD: He was actually taken hostage during a later OPEC meeting by a very notorious terrorist who went by the name Carlos the Jackal, and it was a very traumatic experience for him.

NORTHAM: Yamani was dismissed in 1986 after falling out with senior members of the Saudi royal family. He died in London at the age of 90 and will be buried in his birthplace of Mecca. Jackie Northam, NPR News.

(SOUNDBITE OF ESMERINE'S "THE SPACE IN BETWEEN")

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