Detroit's Big 3 Will Try Again To Get Federal Loans Executives from the top three U.S. automakers return to Washington, D.C., this week. They're going to try, again, to convince Congress to give them federal loans. They say they need the money to avoid an industry collapse. Two weeks ago, Congress sent them away empty-handed.

Detroit's Big 3 Will Try Again To Get Federal Loans

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

NPR's business news starts with another try by the automakers.

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INSKEEP: Executives from GM, Ford, and Chrysler go back to Washington this week. They're going to try again to convince Congress to give them a federal loan. This time, at least two of the executives will avoid flying corporate jets on their way to ask for money, a mode of travel that led to some criticism last time. The executives say they need $25 billion to avoid an industry collapse. A couple of weeks ago, Congress sent them away empty-handed. Some lawmakers were angry that the automakers did not provide a detailed plan of how they would spend the federal loan. Now auto executives reportedly are coming up with plans to show Congress. The measures could include union concessions and possibly getting rid of some brands.

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