There ARE Atheists In Foxholes One year ago, commentator Benjamin Tupper's National Guard unit was embedded with Afghan troops. Tupper, an atheist, recently learned that one of the young interpreters he worked with was captured, tortured and murdered by the Taliban. Tupper hopes the interpreter's vision of an afterlife is real.
NPR logo

There ARE Atheists In Foxholes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/97992274/97992261" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
There ARE Atheists In Foxholes

There ARE Atheists In Foxholes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/97992274/97992261" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

This week, people in Afghanistan and elsewhere are celebrating a Muslim holiday known as Eid Al-Adha, which brings back memories for commentator Benjamin Tupper. A year ago, he was in Afghanistan. His National Guard unit was embedded with Afghan troops, and Tupper recalls a lesson that he received about Islam and about faith.

C: It would be dishonest to say that in the shadow of his tragic and cruel death, I'm now a believer in the afterlife. But I can say if there is such a thing as heaven, Fayez surely belongs there.

INSKEEP: Commentator Benjamin Tupper is a captain in the Army National Guard. You can comment on his essay in the opinion section of our Web site, npr.org.

Copyright © 2008 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.