Our Second Annual National Caroling Party Weekend All Things Considered asked musicians from all over the country to send in their home recordings of the Christmas carol "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town." Then we merged all the submissions — from the professional and the amateur — into one big, joyful chorus.
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Our Second Annual National Caroling Party

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Our Second Annual National Caroling Party

Our Second Annual National Caroling Party

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ANDREA SEABROOK, host:

And now the moment you've all been waiting for.

(Soundbite of fanfare)

(Soundbite of person gargling "Santa Claus Is Coming To Town")

SEABROOK: It's time for NPR's Second Annual National Caroling Party. Over the past two weeks, folks all over the country sent us their home recordings of "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town." Today, we're merging them to create one big national sing-along or in this case, gargle along.

Among the many, many unique approaches you're about to hear, listen for a rapper from Amherst, Massachusetts, a bassist from Kirkwood, Missouri who channels Lou Reed, and a guy in Seattle, who's trained his Nintendo Wii gaming system to perform like a Theremin. Please enjoy this brave new experiment in caroling technology.

(Soundbite of song "Santa Claus Is Coming To Town")

NPR LISTENERS: (Singing) You better watch out. You better not cry, You better not pout. I'm telling you why. Santa Claus is coming to town. He's making a list and checking it twice, He's gonna find out who's naughty and nice. Santa Claus is coming to town.

He sees you when you're sleeping, He knows when you're awake. He knows if you've been bad or good, So be good for goodness sake.

Oh, you better watch out. You better not cry, You better not pout. I'm telling you why, Santa Claus is coming to town.

(Soundbite of song "Santa Claus Is Coming To Town")

Unidentified Male: (Singing) Well, you better watch out. You better not cry, You better not pout. I'm telling you why. Santa Claus is coming to town. Santa Claus is coming to town. The man is coming.

THE FLYING MANGOS: (Singing) You better watch out. You better not cry, You better not pout. I'm telling you why. Santa Claus is coming to town.

NRP LISTENERS: Curly head dolls that toddle and coo, Elephants, boats and kiddie cars, too. Santa Claus is coming to town.

Unidentified Female: (Singing) He sees you when you're sleeping, He knows when you're awake. He knows if you've been bad or good, So be good for goodness sake.

Unidentified Male #2: (Rapping) You better not shout. You better not cry. Better not pout, Sinner sister, throw your hands in the sky. Hit the dance floor, And stuff that stocking. Stuff that stocking, keep it popping. Santa Clause likes good behavior, All up in the club go and kiss your neighbor. Could we play in a bag of coal? Climb in the sleigh like Lando, Calrissian and Han Solo, Chewbacca says merry Christmas, yo.

THE MILLENIUM SINGERS: (humming)

(Soundbite of laughter)

Unidentified girl: That was so weird.

SEABROOK: "Santa Claus Is Coming To Town," as performed by NPR listeners all over the country. Thanks to everyone who played, and sang, and gargled along, and to NPR's own Laura Krantz for the piano recording that got it all started. You can hear a few of the individual performances on our Web site npr.org. And we've also a link to the video of that amazing Wii Theremin.

(Soundbite of Wii theremin playing "Santa Claus Is Coming To Town")

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