Help Wanted: CEO Needs Job Day to Day is looking for stories of the many Americans across the country coping with unemployment. The idea is that by having people share their stories on the air, we might help them find a job. Our latest job candidates is a former CEO.
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Help Wanted: CEO Needs Job

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Help Wanted: CEO Needs Job

Help Wanted: CEO Needs Job

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ALEX COHEN, host:

Back now with Day to Day and more now from our "Help Wanted" project. We've been asking listeners who are out of a job to write in and share their stories. Here's our "Help Wanted" guy, senior producer Steve Proffitt.

STEVE PROFFITT: We've gotten hundreds of emails, but Saul Squire(ph) stood out. He's a CEO who's out of work. Saul was the head of a multinational corporation based in Iceland that was trying to establish a new high-tech industry there.

Mr. SAUL SQUIRE (Unemployed CEO): Retention of very large volumes of corporate data.

PROFFITT: But as you may remember, late last year Iceland's economy melted down, literally imploding in a matter of weeks.

Mr. SQUIRE: I think the metaphor is more like detonated.

PROFFITT: The currency collapsed, the banking system blew up, and Saul's business went right down the tubes.

Mr. SQUIRE: The willingness of people to do business with Iceland is pretty minimal at this point.

PROFFITT: In his letter, Saul wrote that multinational executives, at least the ones not in the orange suits, are a dime a dozen these days. So he's visiting a friend in Minnesota, writing about his experience, and thinking about his next move. He says he's good at going into strange, faraway places and figuring out how to do business there.

Mr. SQUIRE: I have a strong multilingual background, a lot of capacity to deal with foreign cultures, the issues that are inherent in, you know, dealing with a government that perhaps has regulations not like your own.

PROFFITT: On the optimism scale one to 10, 10 being blissfully optimistic and Pollyanna and one being kind of like I'm feeling right now, where would you say you are?

Mr. SQUIRE: I'd say I'm a solid 8.5. You know, we have a banking crisis. And I think there's a very large global motivation to have that resolved quickly, which, you know, once those things are in place, then we have the market we used to know here until fairly recently.

PROFFITT: Saul Squire is former CEO of a multinational tech company, now one of the more than 11 million Americans looking for a job. And an update. Last week we profiled a former zookeeper and strip club manager, Patrick Mulhearn. He was looking for work. Good news, last week he was hired by a state assemblyman to be a field rep. Steve Proffitt, NPR News.

COHEN: If you have an unemployment story to tell, send an email to daydreaming@npr.org. Tell us where you've been, where you hope to go, and how you think you might get there. Again, the address, daydreaming@npr.org.

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